Janelle Jones http://blog.dol.gov/ en The Kids (and the Adults) Aren’t All Right: Job Losses in the Care Sector Extend Beyond Child Care http://blog.dol.gov/2022/01/11/the-kids-and-the-adults-arent-all-right <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Kids (and the Adults) Aren’t All Right: Job Losses in the Care Sector Extend Beyond Child Care</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href=" https://blog.dol.gov/2022/01/11/the-kids-and-the-adults-arent-all-right" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="The Kids (and the Adults) Aren’t All Right: Job Losses in the Care Sector Extend Beyond Child Care" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="Chart: Care economy employment relative to Feb. 2020" /><meta name="twitter:description" content="What the December jobs report reveals about the state of America’s working women and the care economy." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/wb-blog-jan22-care-800x400.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/wb-blog-jan22-care-800x400.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="Chart: Care economy employment relative to Feb. 2020" /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><p>The employment landscape <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2022/01/07/5-numbers-from-the-december-jobs-report" target="_blank">looks much better</a> for workers now than it did a year ago, as the Bureau of Labor Statistics' December jobs report shows. Although the December data predates most Omicron impacts on the labor market, it is encouraging to see that employment continues to increase and the overall unemployment rate has continued to tick down. In December the unemployment rates declined for adult men and adult women (both at 3.6%) – but this was largely driven by changes among white workers as the rates for Black, Asian and Hispanic workers showed little to no change. Things are moving in the right direction, but there is still more to be done to ensure that workers of color – who are often concentrated in low-wage work and are some of the most vulnerable workers – have access to quality jobs and pathways to success.  </p> <p>In addition to masking the differences by race and ethnicity, an overemphasis on topline unemployment figures does little to highlight the challenges facing particular occupations and industries. Adult women’s labor force participation increased slightly in December to 57.8% (+0.3%) and remains at pre-pandemic lows not experienced in more than three decades. Women workers are still down 2.1 million jobs, and women’s employment is fully recovered in only four industries: utilities, professional and business services, construction, and transportation and warehousing. And it is worth noting that three of these four industries employed relatively few women before the pandemic – utilities (<a href="https://www.bls.gov/cps/aa2019/cpsaat18.htm" target="_blank">19.9% of employed workers were women in 2019</a>), construction (10.3%), and transportation and warehousing (24.8%) – making the recovery back to the baseline even less meaningful in relation to women’s overall employment.  </p> <p>While women have made gains in non-traditional industries (defined as those with less than 25% women), many traditionally feminized sectors continue to have significantly fewer workers compared to pre-pandemic numbers. Some of this, such as the decline in jobs in the leisure and hospitality sector, may be due to decreased demand and closed businesses. However, other traditionally women-dominated industries are primarily composed of essential jobs performing labor that provide a foundation necessary for the economy to function. The care sector is a prime example of this phenomenon. As we have seen throughout the pandemic, when care infrastructure – whether for children, people with disabilities or older adults – crumbles, the rest of the nation falters as well. And given cultural expectations around gender roles and caregiving responsibilities within families, it is employed women who tend to carry the heaviest burden.  </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Care Data Graphic" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a1508d06-1872-4469-aa10-93948614ca95" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/wb-blog-jan22-rev0324-care-800x400.png" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Click to see the source data for <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0000000001">total nonfarm</a>, <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES6562440001">child day care services</a>, and <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES6562300001">nursing and residential care facilities</a>.  </figcaption></figure><p>What then, should be done about continued job losses in the care sector? As we have <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/07/rebuilding-the-economy-requires-rebuilding-care-infrastructure" target="_blank">previously covered</a> in this blog series, while the childcare sector has recovered from the significant employment declines experienced in March 2020, 1 in 10 childcare jobs are still “missing” relative to February 2020. Nursing and residential care facilities have fared even worse, with 12% lower employment compared to pre-pandemic. These are industries where the overwhelming majority of workers are women, and provide a service that is vital to the continued employment of women (and men) across the entire economy – not to mention their great importance to the health and wellbeing of the nation.  </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Nursing Data Graph" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d04c3cdf-5565-4cf4-af16-c7a7721d9035" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/wb-blog-jan22-rev0324-v2-nursing-800x400_0.png" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Click to see the source data for <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES6562310001">nursing care facilities</a>, <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES6562330001">community care facilities for the elderly</a>, <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES6562320001">residential mental health facilities</a> and <a href="https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES6562390001">other residential care facilities</a>.  </figcaption></figure><p>While there are problems across the industry, these jobs losses are especially concentrated in nursing care facilities, which in December 2021 had 240,000 fewer employed workers compared to February 2020. This has tremendous implications for the women who formerly held these jobs, some of whom may have transitioned to other industries but many of whom are likely to be unemployed or pushed out of the labor market. It also should serve as a wakeup call to the rest of the nation, as every one of us has the potential to need access to nursing or residential care facilities for ourselves or our loved ones.</p> <p>Part of the problem is that these are jobs that have historically offered low wages and few benefits, despite the essential nature of the work. The median hourly wage across nursing and residential care facilities is only $15.16, which is $32,000 a year. Wages are even lower for home health and personal care aides, and nursing assistants, orderlies, and psychiatric aides who make up 4 in 10 workers in the industry; their median hourly wage is only $13.90, or $29,000 a year. This is difficult and important work, but the longstanding lack of investment to support and retain such a vital workforce is having a negative impact on the care infrastructure in the United States.  </p> <p>As the Department of Labor and the Biden administration have repeatedly noted, the economy cannot fully recover if women are left behind. And there cannot be an equitable recovery without addressing the cracks in the nation’s caregiving infrastructure. We must invest in this essential workforce through education, training, increasing wages and enforcement of existing protections and labor standards.</p> <p><em>Janelle Jones is the department’s chief economist. Sarah Jane Glynn is a senior advisor in the Women’s Bureau. Follow the bureau on Twitter: <a href="https://www.twitter.com/WB_DOL">@WB_DOL</a>.</em></p> <p> </p> <p>EDITOR’S NOTE: This blog has been updated. It originally stated that employment in nursing and residential care facilities was 14.2% lower than pre-pandemic levels. This was corrected to 12.0%. The charts have also been updated to reflect corrected employment change for nursing and residential care facilities, nursing care facilities, residential mental health facilities, community care facilities for the elderly, other residential care facilities.</p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/tkoebel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov">Koebel.Tiffany…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2022-01-11T13:50:48-05:00" title="Tuesday, January 11, 2022 - 13:50" class="datetime">Tue, 01/11/2022 - 13:50</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/wb-blog-jan22-rev0324-v2-nursing-480x360.png" width="480" height="360" alt="Graph showing care economy employment, Feb. 2020 to Dec. 2021" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a>, <a href="/taxonomy/term/4233" hreflang="en">Sarah Jane Glynn</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/womens-bureau" hreflang="en">Women&#039;s Bureau</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/unemployment-rate" hreflang="en">unemployment rate</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bureau-of-labor-statistics" hreflang="en">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bls-data" hreflang="en">BLS data</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/working-women" hreflang="en">working women</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/caregiving" hreflang="en">caregiving</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/nursing" hreflang="en">nursing</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/home-health-care" hreflang="en">home health care</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:50:48 +0000 Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov 4028 at http://blog.dol.gov 5 Numbers From the December Jobs Report http://blog.dol.gov/2022/01/07/5-numbers-from-the-december-jobs-report <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Numbers From the December Jobs Report</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2022/01/07/5-numbers-from-the-december-jobs-report" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="5 Numbers from the December Jobs Report" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content=" December Jobs Report. 3.9% unemployment rate. 3.8% Asian. 7.1% Black. 4.9% Hispanic. 3.2% white." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Chief Economist Janelle Jones highlights five numbers from the latest jobs report and what they mean for the U.S. economy." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/blog-Dec21_0.png”&gt;&lt;meta property=" og:image:url="" https:="" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="December Jobs Report. 3.9% unemployment rate. 3.8% Asian. 7.1% Black. 4.9% Hispanic. 3.2% white." /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><img alt="December Jobs Report. 3.9% unemployment rate. 3.8% Asian. 7.1% Black. 4.9% Hispanic. 3.2% white." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="99f9dbcc-cd34-4c88-99b4-76031e2d883a" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/blog-Dec21_0.png" class="align-center" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><p>These are dark, cold days, but every week brings more sunlight – and there’s even more cause for optimism in <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest jobs report</a>. We added 6.4 million new jobs in 2021 and the unemployment rate has dropped to 3.9%. Here are five more numbers to pay attention to from the December jobs report.</p> <p><strong>3.9% unemployment rate</strong></p> <p>The unemployment rate dropped 0.3 percentage points in December, marking the first time the unemployment rate dipped below 4% since the pandemic began.</p> <p><strong>84% jobs recovered</strong></p> <p>Speaking of the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve recovered 84% of the jobs lost in March and April 2020. And we’ve recovered these 18.8 million jobs years faster than economists predicted.</p> <p><strong>2x+ Black unemployment rate</strong></p> <p>If you’ve read any of my blogs, you know I care about demographics. The true measure of economic success is how the economy is doing for those usually left behind. Currently, the Black unemployment rate is more than double the white unemployment rate, and Black women were the only demographic group who saw unemployment rise in December. I’ll never get tired of saying it: An economic recovery is not complete unless <em>everyone </em>recovers, so there’s still work to do.</p> <p><strong>-12K government jobs</strong></p> <p>While private sector growth has been strong, government employment has recovered only 39% of the 1.5 million jobs lost in March, April and May 2020. That means the public sector has shrunk by 927,000 jobs since the start of the pandemic, including 12,000 in December. We’ll need a robust public sector to enact the policies that will help us combat the virus and ensure ongoing economic growth.</p> <p><strong>+53K leisure and hospitality jobs</strong></p> <p>I don’t know about you, but I could use a little R&amp;R, so I was glad to see the leisure and hospitality industry added 53,000 jobs in December. That said, they’re still down 1.2 million from spring 2020 – and ongoing pandemic concerns will delay full recovery in this area. The more we can do to manage the virus – masks, social distancing, vaccines, etc. – the faster this industry will be able to recover.</p> <p><strong>Bonus number: +492K COVID cases</strong></p> <p>Sorry to end on a downer, but let’s be practical. The moving average for U.S. COVID cases was around 119,000 during the December reference period, and it’s risen dramatically since then – to about 492,000 on Jan. 3. We know the pandemic can stifle economic growth. But we also know we can take simple steps to protect ourselves, our friends and families, our coworkers, our healthcare workers and our communities.</p> <p>Vaccines are safe. Vaccines are free. Vaccines save lives. If you’re looking for a vaccine – or information to share with a vaccine-hesitant loved one – check out <a href="https://www.vaccines.gov/">vaccines.gov</a>.</p> <p>Happy New Year! Here's hoping for more of the historic progress we saw in 2021, and continuing with the hard work toward an equitable and robust recovery.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.</em></p> <p> </p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2022-01-07T10:37:58-05:00" title="Friday, January 7, 2022 - 10:37" class="datetime">Fri, 01/07/2022 - 10:37</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/blog-Dec21-featured.png" width="480" height="360" alt="December Jobs Report. 3.9% unemployment rate. 3.8% Asian. 7.1% Black. 4.9% Hispanic. 3.2% white." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/numbers-day" hreflang="en">Numbers Day</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-numbers" hreflang="en">jobs numbers</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-report" hreflang="en">Jobs Report</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/unemployment-rate" hreflang="en">unemployment rate</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 07 Jan 2022 15:37:58 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 4025 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2022/01/07/5-numbers-from-the-december-jobs-report#comments Raising the Wage for Federal Contract Workers http://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/07/raising-the-wage-for-federal-contract-workers <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Raising the Wage for Federal Contract Workers</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In November, the Wage and Hour Division published <a href="https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/government-contracts/eo14026/">a final rule increasing the minimum wage for federal contract workers</a> to $15/hour. The rule will go into effect on Jan. 30, 2022. Check out my video to see what this wage increase will mean for affected workers.</p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dOCT32X6OSg" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe></p> <p><em>Janelle Jones is the Chief Economist of the U.S. Department of Labor</em></p> <!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/07/raising-the-wage-for-federal-contract-workers" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="Raising the Wage for Federal Contractors" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="5 Numbers: Minimum Wage Final Rule" /><meta name="twitter:description" content="On Jan. 30, 2022, the minimum wage for federal contract workers will rise to $15/hour. " /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/OPA/newsletter/2021/12/20211210-minwage_600.jpg" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/OPA/newsletter/2021/12/20211210-minwage_600.jpg" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="5 Numbers: Minimum Wage Final Rule/&gt;&lt;!-- END TWITTER CARD --&gt;&lt;/body&gt;&lt;/html&gt;" /></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-12-07T16:19:12-05:00" title="Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 16:19" class="datetime">Tue, 12/07/2021 - 16:19</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/MinWageEO-480x360.jpg" width="480" height="360" alt="5 Numbers: Minimum Wage Final Rule" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/wage-and-hour-division-whd" hreflang="en">Wage and Hour Division (WHD)</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/minimum-wage" hreflang="en">minimum wage</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/federal-contractors" hreflang="en">federal contractors</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 07 Dec 2021 21:19:12 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 4010 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/07/raising-the-wage-for-federal-contract-workers#comments 5 Numbers from the November Jobs Report http://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/03/5-numbers-from-the-november-jobs-report <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Numbers from the November Jobs Report</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><center><img alt="November Jobs Report. +210,000 jobs added. 4.2% unemployment rate." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="8ec628a1-420c-48d3-8bd5-e5804b3f111d" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/nov21-210k-4.2-600x300.png" class="align-center" width="600" height="300" loading="lazy" /></center> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{47}" paraid="1121638896">America’s economy continues to rebound from the pandemic, according to the latest <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs report</a>. The unemployment rate dropped from 4.6% to 4.2% in November, as the economy added 210,000 new jobs. Here are five more numbers from the November jobs report to keep an eye on. </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{78}" paraid="500216312"><strong>61.8% </strong></p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{86}" paraid="1433571095">The labor force participation rate, which measures the share of people who are working or actively looking for work, hasn’t changed much since June 2020. In November, the participation rate edged up to 61.8%. Along with rising total employment and a decreasing unemployment rate, this is a positive indicator for U.S. economic growth.  </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{102}" paraid="2104184089"><strong>3.6 million </strong></p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{110}" paraid="510898214">There are many factors that could reduce labor force participation, including early retirement, childcare obligations, shifting career priorities and the desire for better working conditions. One probable factor affecting the labor force participation rate is the pandemic. In November, 3.6 million people reported that they couldn’t work, or worked fewer hours, due to COVID-19. This pandemic is still impacting our economy, but vaccines and boosters are helping – so <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">follow the CDC recommendations</a> and <a href="https://www.vaccines.gov/" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">schedule your shots</a>, folks! – as are policies designed to <a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/build-back-better/" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">improve childcare options and working conditions</a>. </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{150}" paraid="1700800464"><strong>83% </strong></p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{158}" paraid="849868011">We’ve now recovered 83% (18.5 million) of the 22.4 million jobs lost in March and April 2020. Two industries – financial activities, and transportation and warehousing – have fully recovered. There’s more work to do before we achieve a full economic recovery, but this is good, steady progress in the right direction. </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{180}" paraid="1659927223"><strong>23% </strong></p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{188}" paraid="1465554196">Long-term unemployment continues to be a problem for many workers of color. Black people account for 13% of the U.S. population, but make up 23% of workers who have been unemployed for 52 weeks or longer. Economic growth works best when it works for everyone, so <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/02/09/a-more-inclusive-economy-is-key-to-recovery" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">it’s important to make sure our policies help all America’s workers return to work</a>.  </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{207}" paraid="416723346"><strong>4.2% </strong></p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{215}" paraid="1796024880">I’m coming back to it because it’s just so good. The 4.2% unemployment rate shows just how quickly Biden-Harris administration policies are fueling this recovery. After the Great Recession, the unemployment rate took far longer to recover, and for this recession the Congressional Budget Office didn’t expect the rate to get this low until 2024.  </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{225}" paraid="1118051933">In short: The total number of employed people is rising and the unemployment rate is dropping. There’s plenty of room for growth, but we’re on the right track and even ahead of schedule by some measures. As we focus on building back better, our next steps will involve reducing COVID-19 risks, continuing to spur economic growth, and ensuring that all workers – including those who have been traditionally overlooked in previous recoveries – are benefiting from our nation’s economic progress.  </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{242}" paraid="14655150"> </p> <p paraeid="{3dd74bb6-3e9e-4b2b-8d68-9ede95dad034}{244}" paraid="1693400303"><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.  </em></p> <!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/03/5-numbers-from-the-november-jobs-report" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="5 Numbers from the November Jobs Report" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="November Jobs Report. +210,000 jobs added. 4.2% unemployment rate." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Chief Economist Janelle Jones highlights 5 numbers from the latest jobs report." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/nov21-210k-4.2-600x300.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/nov21-210k-4.2-600x300.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="November Jobs Report. +210,000 jobs added. 4.2% unemployment rate." /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-12-03T11:53:56-05:00" title="Friday, December 3, 2021 - 11:53" class="datetime">Fri, 12/03/2021 - 11:53</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/nov21-210k-4.2-480x360.png" width="480" height="360" alt="November Jobs Report. +210,000 jobs added. 4.2% unemployment rate." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-report" hreflang="en">Jobs Report</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/numbers-day" hreflang="en">Numbers Day</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-numbers" hreflang="en">jobs numbers</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/unemployment-rate" hreflang="en">unemployment rate</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 03 Dec 2021 16:53:56 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 4002 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2021/12/03/5-numbers-from-the-november-jobs-report#comments Building an Economy that Works for Women http://blog.dol.gov/2021/11/09/building-an-economy-that-works-for-women <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Building an Economy that Works for Women </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ October jobs report contained <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/11/05/5-numbers-from-the-october-jobs-report" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">many positive changes</a>, including strong jobs gains and upward revisions for previous months’ job growth. Women workers appear to have done especially well last month, accounting for more than half (304,000 or 57.2%) of all jobs gains. Adult women’s employment and labor force participation rose, both of which are positive signs that offset each other, leading to the largely unchanged women’s unemployment rate.</p><p>Unfortunately, one month’s gains, even when coupled with previous months’ upward revisions, are not enough to fully undo the impact of the pandemic on women’s employment. There are still 2.6 million women missing from work, as the number of employed women is still 3.2% lower than it was in February 2020. By way of comparison, men’s employment is down 2.6%, accounting for 2.1 million men. </p><p>These topline numbers, while important, mask many of the ways that the pandemic’s impact on employment continues to play out differently for different groups of women. Black and Hispanic women’s employment has not recovered as much as white women’s, and employment losses for Black women since the start of the pandemic have been far greater than those experienced by white and Hispanic women.  </p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/WB_covid-blog-v2-eth-800x400.png" data-entity-uuid="5f8c41bc-13e5-4fee-9484-1ee94317a1cd" data-entity-type="file" alt="Employment Losses by Sex, Race and Ethnicity: October 2021 Employment Relative to February 2020 Employment" class="align-center" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><h6><a href="#chart1"><sub>Employment Losses by Sex, Race and Ethnicity: October 2021 Employment Relative to February 2020 Employment (plain text)</sub></a></h6><p>Black women’s unemployment rate fell from 7.3% in September to 7.0% in October – but not because they gained jobs. In fact, over that time period the economy lost 34,000 employed Black women, and a total of 52,000 Black women left the labor force entirely. By way of contrast, white women added 165,000 jobs, and 292,000 white women entered or rejoined the labor force, meaning that they were working or actively searching for a job. Hispanic women of any race added 94,000 jobs, and 114,000 Hispanic women entered or rejoined the labor force. This is not to say that white and Hispanic women are no longer experiencing employment challenges, as their overall employment has not rebounded to pre-pandemic levels (nor has men’s). However, the data does indicate that Black women are having a different experience as the economy recovers, and more needs to be done to support their reentry into the labor force and employment.  </p><p>Women – women of color specifically, and Black women particularly – have faced additional employment challenges for overlapping reasons. Part of the problem is that the industries hardest hit by the pandemic, such as leisure and hospitality and education and health services, are ones that disproportionately employ women and women of color. As these industries regain jobs (leisure and hospitality added 164,000 jobs, 96,000 of which went to women) we should expect to see women’s employment and labor force participation increase.  </p><p>Unfortunately, many women can't reenter the labor force or take a new job due to their caregiving responsibilities. Women are more likely than men to be responsible for family caregiving, whether for children, elders or other family members with needs. One big missing piece of the puzzle for women is child care. Employment is down by 10% in child daycare services since February 2020, with 105,400 fewer workers employed in the industry. This is a double whammy for working women, since when child care is not available mothers of young children cannot work, and because the majority of childcare workers are women – and are especially likely to be women of color.  </p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/WB_covidblog-v2_daycare-800x400.png" data-entity-uuid="538c39dd-b63f-4bdc-b0bd-7561fc56a7b0" data-entity-type="file" alt="Employment in Child Day Care Service (in thousands) " class="align-center" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><h6><a href="#chart2"><sub>Employment in Child Day Care Service (plain text)</sub></a></h6><p> </p><p>The economy will not be fully recovered until women – including women of color – can take care of their families and maintain employment. And this will not be possible until care for children is more universally available. While the recent approval of vaccines for children ages 5-11 will likely help to decrease school closures and hopefully provide much needed stability for working parents, rebuilding the childcare sector for younger children is also necessary to enable mothers to work, and to help re-fill the 100,000+ job losses in the industry. The economy can’t work if women don’t work, and women can’t work if their children aren’t cared for. Investments in the childcare sector through the Build Back Better Act, including making care more affordable for working families and increasing pay for the workers providing this vital service, are important next steps. </p><p>The Department of Labor is committed to tracking the unique employment situation of women, women of color, and mothers, as this data will be necessary to ensure an equitable recovery to help us build back a better, stronger economy that works for everyone.</p><p><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.  Wendy Chun-Hoon is the director of the Women’s Bureau. Follow the Women’s Bureau on Twitter at </em><a href="https://www.twitter.com/wb_dol" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank"><em>@WB_DOL</em></a><em>. </em></p><p> </p><p><a id="chart1"><strong>Employment Losses by Sex, Race and Ethnicity: October 2021 Employment Relative to February 2020 Employment</strong></a></p><table style="width:200px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td>Black men</td><td>-2.4%</td></tr><tr><td>Black women</td><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">-5.3%</span></td></tr><tr><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">Hispanic men </span></td><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">-0.7%</span></td></tr><tr><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">Hispanic women</span></td><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">-3.9%</span></td></tr><tr><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">White men </span></td><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">-2.7%</span></td></tr><tr><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">White women</span></td><td><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;line-height:107%;">-3.6%</span></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Note: Seasonally adjusted employment of women and men ages 20 and older. Estimates for Asian women and men not available. </p><p>Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey </p><p><a href="#chart1return">Return</a></p><p> </p><p><a id="chart2"><strong>Employment in Child Day Care Service (in thousands) </strong></a></p><table style="width:500px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td>February 2020</td><td>1046.5</td></tr><tr><td>March 2020</td><td>1012.9</td></tr><tr><td>April 2020</td><td>673.2</td></tr><tr><td>May 2020</td><td>704.5</td></tr><tr><td>June 2020</td><td>789.8</td></tr><tr><td>July 2020</td><td>828.4</td></tr><tr><td>August 2020</td><td>845.6</td></tr><tr><td>September 2020</td><td>863.8</td></tr><tr><td>October 2020</td><td>871.0</td></tr><tr><td>November 2020</td><td>870.1</td></tr><tr><td>December 2021</td><td>873.5</td></tr><tr><td>January 2021</td><td>866.6</td></tr><tr><td>February 2021</td><td>879.8</td></tr><tr><td>March 2021</td><td>882.3</td></tr><tr><td>April 2021</td><td>893.7</td></tr><tr><td>May 2021</td><td>906.0</td></tr><tr><td>June 2021</td><td>930.0</td></tr><tr><td>July 2021</td><td>925.4</td></tr><tr><td>August 2021</td><td>920.0</td></tr><tr><td>September 2021</td><td>940.4</td></tr><tr><td>October 2021</td><td>941.1</td></tr></tbody></table><p>Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics</p><p>Note: Seasonally adjusted employment.</p><p><a href="#chart2return">Return</a></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/tkoebel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov">Koebel.Tiffany…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-11-09T13:30:03-05:00" title="Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 13:30" class="datetime">Tue, 11/09/2021 - 13:30</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/WB_covid-blog-v2-eth-480x360.png" width="480" height="360" alt="Employment Losses by Sex, Race and Ethnicity: October 2021 Employment Relative to February 2020 Employment " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a>, <a href="/taxonomy/term/4099" hreflang="en">Wendy Chun-Hoon</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/4093" hreflang="en">Equity</a></li> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/4133" hreflang="en">pandemic</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/women-of-color" hreflang="en">women of color</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-report" hreflang="en">Jobs Report</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bureau-of-labor-statistics" hreflang="en">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/child-care" hreflang="en">child care</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/caregiving" hreflang="en">caregiving</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/womens-bureau" hreflang="en">Women&#039;s Bureau</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 09 Nov 2021 18:30:03 +0000 Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov 3981 at http://blog.dol.gov 5 Numbers from the October Jobs Report http://blog.dol.gov/2021/11/05/5-numbers-from-the-october-jobs-report <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Numbers from the October Jobs Report</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><img alt="October Jobs Report. +531,000 jobs added. 4.6% unemployment rate. " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="97037946-0ff4-4912-911d-82cb45d1ff65" height="400" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/211105-employment.png" width="800" class="align-center" loading="lazy" /><p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{55}" paraid="102532079">Employment rates are on the rise, and America’s workforce is finding jobs. <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest jobs report</a> showed 531,000 new jobs in October, and the unemployment rate dropped to 4.6%. Here are five numbers to help you make sense of the October jobs report. </p> <h4 paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{82}" paraid="931224400"><strong>81% </strong></h4> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{92}" paraid="1724288708">We’ve recovered 18.2 million jobs, or 81% of the 22.4 million jobs lost in March and April 2020. We won’t have a full economic recovery until we recover from the pandemic – but this shows that we’re on the right track, and the Biden-Harris administration’s policies are moving the economy in the right direction. More than 62% of eligible workers in the U.S. have already received at least one COVID-19 shot, and <a href="https://www.osha.gov/vaxETS" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">OSHA’s new Emergency Temporary Standard</a> will help build on that progress. Visit <a href="https://www.vaccines.gov/" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">vaccines.gov</a> for more info on vaccines and booster shots, or to schedule an appointment. </p> <h4 paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{116}" paraid="584740487"><strong>+235,000 </strong></h4> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{126}" paraid="1305262016">Every month, when the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases the latest jobs data, they also revise the data from the most recent two months. Those revisions take into account new information that wasn’t available at the time of the initial release. The latest report showed that job growth in August and September was even higher than initially reported. August jobs were revised up from +366,000 to +483,000, and September from +194,000 to +312,000. In short, the economy added 235,000 more jobs in August and September than initially reported.   </p> <h4 paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{132}" paraid="1102189835"><strong>57.3% </strong></h4> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{142}" paraid="1297871104">Women were hit especially hard in the pandemic – both because of the sectors in which they are more likely to work, and because they’re more likely to take on critical but unpaid care work at home. In October, 57.3% of job gains went to women, but they still hold 2.4 million fewer jobs than in February 2020. Nearly 1 million (916,000) women age 25-54 have left the labor force since February 2020, accounting for 68% of the total decline.  </p> <h4 paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{150}" paraid="1530494519"><strong>61.6% </strong></h4> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{160}" paraid="1101495600">The unemployment rate dropped, but the labor force participation rate is holding steady. October’s rate (61.6%) was around the same as what we’ve seen in the last year.  We want to see it go up to its pre-pandemic level of approximately 63%. That means bringing people back off the sidelines. Two things keeping people out of work are the pandemic and the lack of affordable care – which is why the Build Back Better agenda is investing on solutions that will improve public health, support working families, and get people back to work.   </p> <h4 paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{166}" paraid="2108013291"><strong>7.9% </strong></h4> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{176}" paraid="2129509668">Here’s another number that’s been stuck too long in the same place. The unemployment rate for Black Americans stayed at 7.9% this month, higher than for Hispanic (5.9%), Asian (4.2%) or white (4.0%) workers.  Black workers are also disproportionately represented among those who have been out of work for a year or more. While Black workers account for only 13% of the labor force, they make up 20% of the long-term unemployed.  </p> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{192}" paraid="1188896360">The coronavirus continues to influence job markets all over the world, but vaccinations and new treatments are improving public health, lowering transmission rates and raising confidence. Smart economic policy is helping too. Before the American Rescue Plan, the Congressional Budget Office was estimating that we’d need another two years to reach 4.6% unemployment – but the Biden-Harris administration’s policies are getting us back on track a lot faster than that.  </p> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{240}" paraid="441129995">There’s more work to do to ensure an equitable recovery for all workers, but October’s data shows us we’re moving in the right direction.  </p> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{250}" paraid="1693400303"> </p> <p paraeid="{63ef5b78-7d8e-4716-adf8-da8be2b93aa2}{254}" paraid="333162618"><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.  </em></p> <!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://www.blog.dol.gov/2021/11/05/5-numbers-from-the-october-jobs-report" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="5 Numbers from the October Jobs Report" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="October Jobs Report. +531,000 jobs added. 4.6% unemployment rate." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Chief Economist Janelle Jones shares takeaways from the latest economic situation report." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/211105-employment.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/211105-employment.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="October Jobs Report. +531,000 jobs added. 4.6% unemployment rate. " /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-11-05T13:01:59-04:00" title="Friday, November 5, 2021 - 13:01" class="datetime">Fri, 11/05/2021 - 13:01</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/211105-employment_featured.png" width="480" height="360" alt="October Jobs Report. +531,000 jobs added. 4.6% unemployment rate. " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/data" hreflang="en">data</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-report" hreflang="en">Jobs Report</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/employment-situation-report" hreflang="en">Employment Situation report</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 05 Nov 2021 17:01:59 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 3976 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2021/11/05/5-numbers-from-the-october-jobs-report#comments Equity Snapshot: Apprenticeships in America http://blog.dol.gov/2021/11/03/equity-snapshot-apprenticeships-in-america <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Equity Snapshot: Apprenticeships in America</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/11/03/equity-snapshot-apprenticeships-in-america" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="Equity Snapshot: Apprenticeships in America" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="We still have a long way to go toward advancing equity in apprenticeship participation." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Though apprenticeships have a proven track record of producing strong results for both employers and workers, we still have a long way to go toward advancing equity in apprenticeship participation." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/Equity%20in%20apprenticeships%20blog-Chart%201%20%281%29%20%282%29.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/Equity%20in%20apprenticeships%20blog-Chart%201%20%281%29%20%282%29.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="Though apprenticeships have a proven track record of producing strong results for both employers and workers, we still have a long way to go toward advancing equity in apprenticeship participation." /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><p>At the Department of Labor, we’re committed to <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/06/24/equity-snapshot-our-commitment-to-promoting-equity-in-federal-contracting">advancing equity across all the programs and populations we support</a>, including our efforts to increase awareness of and opportunities in apprenticeship — a proven industry-driven career pathway where employers can develop their future workforce and workers can get critical experience through paid and credentialed programs.</p> <p>Though less common in the U.S. than in Europe, U.S. apprenticeship participation is on the rise. In fiscal year 2020 alone, 3,143 new programs were established, representing a 73% increase from 2009, and the number of active Registered Apprentices grew by 51% in the same period. And these programs are incredibly successful: 92% of apprentices retain employment after completing a Registered Apprenticeship and earn an average starting salary of $72,000.</p> <p>Though apprenticeships have a proven track record of producing strong results for both employers and workers, we still have a long way to go toward advancing equity in apprenticeship participation. In this equity snapshot, we explore what data we have and what we still need to know to ensure apprenticeship programs are equitably serving all populations. <strong>Here are some of our key findings:</strong></p> <h4><strong>Though most apprentices are white, programs have become more diverse over time</strong></h4> <p>According to demographic data provided by 686,000 apprentices between 2010 and 2019, 77.5% identified as white, 15.3% as Black, 2.9% American Indian/Alaska Native, 2.1% Asian, 1.6% Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, and 0.5% as multi-racial.  With regard to ethnicity, 567,000 apprentices provided information with 18.3% identifying as Hispanic. </p> <p>But as Figure 1 shows, apprentices have become more diverse over time. This suggests that efforts to boost participation and equity are working — but there’s still more work to be done.</p> <p> </p> <center><img alt="Share of Apprenticeship Participants 2010 vs. 2019" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="9ae2c672-1b9c-4b52-9f33-c7ab6b29a698" height="367" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Equity%20in%20apprenticeships%20blog-Chart%201%20%281%29%20%282%29.png" width="733" loading="lazy" /></center> <p> </p> <p><a href="#Fig1">Figure 1. Share of Apprenticeship Participants 2010 vs. 2019 (plain text)</a></p> <h4><strong>For many racial groups, apprentice representation was higher than overall labor force participation</strong></h4> <p>When comparing apprenticeship participation to the annual average share of labor force participation across all racial groups (Figure 2), we found Black apprentice representation was higher than their labor force representation in 17 industries, and American Indian or Alaska Native apprentices and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islanders outpaced average representation in 18 industries. This includes construction apprentices, where racial group participation rates mirrored the civilian workforce.</p> <p> </p> <center><img alt="Figure 2: Comparison of Apprenticeship Distribution and Labor Force" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="8bdc8171-54b9-434a-8c5f-a372939769f0" height="375" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Equity%20in%20apprenticeships%20blog-Chart%202%20%283%29.png" width="749" loading="lazy" /></center> <p> </p> <p><a href="#Fig2">Figure 2. Comparison of Apprenticeship Distribution and Labor Force (plain text)</a></p> <h4><strong>However, representation of Asian apprentices and apprentices of two or more races fall well below their labor force share</strong></h4> <p>Though some apprentice groups outpaced their peers in the general labor force, this was not the case for Asian apprentices. Whether these issues are structural we aren’t able to address, but we did identify two important issues to note: First, the grouping of Asian sub-groups into a single category may mask additional inequities among these various sub-groups. Second, there are possible identification issues associated with apprentices of two or more races, since survey respondents may self-select into a single racial group without being made aware of the multi-racial category — both of which should be addressed by follow-up surveys to correct and update the data. </p> <h4><strong>Hispanic representation among apprentices is on the rise</strong></h4> <p>Apprentices identifying as Hispanic represented 18.3% of all apprentices from 2010-2019, with an average annual proportion of 15.5%. Hispanic representation among apprentices has been increasing between 2010 and 2019, with the largest jump in representation in 2017 from 14.4 to 22.4%.  The overall labor force participation of Hispanics during this time was 16.3%, demonstrating that that though Hispanics hare overrepresented in Registered Apprenticeship programs, they have historically been underrepresented in the labor force overall. </p> <h4><strong>Black apprentices are less likely to complete apprenticeship programs than their white peers</strong></h4> <p>From an equity standpoint, there should be no significant difference in apprenticeship completion rates for individuals of various racial groups or by gender, but our data indicated that this is not the case. While completion rates are below 35% for all racial groups, which speak to the general difficulty of apprenticeships, completion rates for White apprentices reached 33% but only 24% for Black apprentices. Asian apprentices are the only other group to eclipse 30% completion, which suggests that there are factors in play that are negatively affecting completion equity.</p> <h4><strong>Women make up only a small portion of apprentices</strong></h4> <p>Historically, women have not been well represented in apprenticeship programs or in construction industries (where many apprenticeships exist) in general. Between 2010 and 2019, women accounted for an average of 8.5% of apprentices, and only 3.5% of construction apprentices. <a href="https://www.mathematica.org/publications/an-effectiveness-assessment-and-costbenefit-analysis-of-registered-apprenticeship-in-10-states">One study</a> indicated that difficulties securing childcare and lack of pay for classroom instruction were significant barriers to participation and completion of apprenticeship programs – a common narrative for not only apprenticeships, but labor force participation in general.</p> <h4><strong>Additional data is necessary to conduct a full equity analysis</strong></h4> <p>Though our analysis yielded some helpful insights, we uncovered gaps in available data, making a full analysis of apprenticeship equity difficult. For example, we are only able to collect demographic information from program participants and not from applications, and the percentage of apprentices who did not provide demographic information recently jumped from 0 to 10 percent, leaving us with an incomplete picture of the full apprenticeship landscape.</p> <p>Additionally, as mentioned above, our existing data can’t tell us which Asian and Hispanic sub-groups apprentices identify as, which is necessary to identify and address systemic issues facing these groups. And finally, racial groups are not uniformly distributed across the United States, meaning that we should account for geographic concentrations of various populations to get a better sense of apprenticeship accessibility and labor mobility.</p> <p>These are just a few examples of what we know (and what we don’t) when it comes to assessing equity across apprenticeship programs. We can’t address what we don’t measure and improving the collection and quality of our data will help us better identify where we are making progress and where we need to improve — in our apprenticeship programs and beyond.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/OPA/files/20211103-apprenticeship-equity.pdf">Read our full Apprenticeship Equity Snapshot Memo here.</a></strong></p> <p><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist, Alexander Hertel-Fernandez is the deputy assistant secretary for research and evaluation, and Christopher DeCarlo is an economist at the U.S. Department of Labor.</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><a id="Fig1">Figure 1. Share of Apprenticeship Participants 2010 vs. 2019</a></strong></p> <table border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" style="width: 647px;"><tbody><tr><td style="width: 151px;"><strong>Racial Group</strong></td> <td style="width: 155px;"><strong>Share of All Apprenticeships 2010</strong></td> <td style="width: 155px;"><strong>Share of All Apprenticeships 2019</strong></td> <td style="width: 163px;"><strong>Percent Change in Apprenticeship Share</strong></td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">American Indian or Alaska Native</td> <td style="width: 155px;">3.4%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.8%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">-46.3%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Asian</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.7%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">2.2%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">27.9%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Black or African American</td> <td style="width: 155px;">12.8%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">17.1%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">33.3%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Two or More Races</td> <td style="width: 155px;">0.0%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.4%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">3248.1%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.4%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.3%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">-6.4%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">White</td> <td style="width: 155px;">80.7%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">76.2%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">-5.6%</td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> <p><strong><a id="Fig2">Figure 2. Comparison of Apprenticeship Distribution and Labor Force</a></strong></p> <table border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" style="width: 647px;"><tbody><tr><td style="width: 151px;"><strong>Racial Group</strong></td> <td style="width: 155px;"><strong>Annual Average Apprenticeship Share<br /> 2010-2019</strong></td> <td style="width: 155px;"><strong>Annual Average Share of Labor Force<br /> 2010-2019</strong></td> <td style="width: 163px;"><strong>Change in Share of Labor Force<br /> 2010-2019</strong></td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">American Indian or Alaska Native</td> <td style="width: 155px;">3.1%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.0%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">43.8%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Asian</td> <td style="width: 155px;">2.1%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">5.6%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">35.8%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Black or African American</td> <td style="width: 155px;">14.9%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">12.2%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">8.7%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Two or More Races*</td> <td style="width: 155px;">0.4%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.9%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">20.8%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander</td> <td style="width: 155px;">1.6%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">0.4%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">40.6%</td> </tr><tr><td style="width: 151px;">White</td> <td style="width: 155px;">78.1%</td> <td style="width: 155px;">79.1%</td> <td style="width: 163px;">-4.8%</td> </tr></tbody></table><p>(*) Labor force data for individuals of two or more races is available only back to 2015.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/burke.alison.e%40dol.gov" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Burke.Alison.E@dol.gov">Burke.Alison.E…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-11-04T13:20:44-04:00" title="Thursday, November 4, 2021 - 13:20" class="datetime">Thu, 11/04/2021 - 13:20</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/Equity%20in%20apprenticeships%20blog-Chart%201%20%281%29%20%282%29.png" width="800" height="400" alt="Share of Apprenticeship Participants 2010 vs. 2019" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a>, <a href="/taxonomy/term/4091" hreflang="en">Alexander Hertel-Fernandez</a>, <a href="/taxonomy/term/4141" hreflang="en">Christopher DeCarlo</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/4093" hreflang="en">Equity</a></li> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/4092" hreflang="en">Diversity and Inclusion</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> </ul> </div> Thu, 04 Nov 2021 17:20:44 +0000 Burke.Alison.E@dol.gov 3978 at http://blog.dol.gov 5 Numbers from the September Jobs Report http://blog.dol.gov/2021/10/08/5-numbers-from-the-september-jobs-report <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Numbers from the September Jobs Report</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/10/08/5-numbers-from-the-september-jobs-report" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="5 Numbers from the September Jobs Report" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="September 2021: 4.8% unemployment rate. Asian 4.2%, Black 7.9%, Hispanic 6.3% and white 4.2%." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Chief Economist Janelle Jones shares takeaways from the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Situation report." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/sept21-bargraph-tw.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/sept21-bargraph-tw.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="September 2021: 4.8% unemployment rate. Asian 4.2%, Black 7.9%, Hispanic 6.3% and white 4.2%." /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><img alt="September 2021: 4.8% unemployment rate. Asian 4.2%, Black 7.9%, Hispanic 6.3% and white 4.2%. Source: bls.gov. dol.gov" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2386ae65-59ef-4505-b677-fd7db62c4562" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/sept21-bargraph-tw.png" class="align-center" width="1024" height="512" loading="lazy" /><p>Today’s <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics</a>, much like the August report, shows a steady and consistent economic recovery, but with room for even stronger gains in certain areas. Employment rose by 194,000 and the unemployment rate dropped from 5.2% to 4.8%. Private sector growth was even stronger than those numbers indicate, with an increase of 317,000. But that growth was offset by a weak month in the government sector. The labor force participation rate is also hovering stubbornly at a basically steady 61.6%. To truly capture our full economic potential, that number needs to rise.</p> <p>The need for bold economic investment is as urgent as ever, and President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda and the bipartisan infrastructure framework can accelerate our path to sustained growth and competitiveness, with focused efforts to lift up communities that have been historically slow to achieve economic stability in the aftermath of a crisis.</p> <p>Here are five numbers from the September jobs report to pay attention to.</p> <p><strong>4.8%(rate)</strong></p> <p>Before the American Rescue Plan passed, the Congressional Budget Office projected that a return to an unemployment rate of 4.8% would not occur until 2023. Historic growth since then has put us in a much, much better place than expected. While individual months may fluctuate to some degree, and certain sectors may grow or lag as a result of a variety of factors, the trend since February is one of rapid recovery.</p> <p><strong>191,000 </strong></p> <p>This was the 8-month peak in the daily coronavirus case rate on Sept. 1. The reference period for this report closely followed that peak, as cases were dropping but remained elevated.</p> <p>We won’t have an economic recovery without first beating the pandemic. Public health must remain our priority and employer vaccine requirements are working to bring case numbers down and get more people back to work. Employer vaccine requirements, including those of the federal government, and supports like paid time off for vaccination are good for business and good for the prospects of our economy.</p> <p>If you need a vaccine or a booster (or know someone who does) check out <a href="https://www.vaccine.gov/" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">vaccines.gov</a> to find a vaccination site near you.</p> <p><strong>+0.6%</strong></p> <p>Wages grew by 19 cents per hour on average, or 0.6%. Wage growth is good news for workers, especially those who have suffered stagnant wages for years. However, the rate of wage growth slowed this month. This means that while recovery efforts are taking hold, it’s no substitute for developing policies to build on economic growth and increase worker power in the long term.</p> <p><strong>-0.9%</strong></p> <p>We have kept a close eye on the unemployment rates by race, and the Black unemployment rate came down almost a full point since last month, from 8.8% to 7.9%. That’s significant, but we know that not all of that drop is because workers found jobs. Some also left the labor force. Sustained work to eliminate racial gaps will lead to decreases in the Black unemployment rate for the right reasons.</p> <p>The unemployment rate also came down for whites, from 4.5% to 4.2%, and remained relatively unchanged for Asians (4.2%) and Hispanics (6.3%). Unemployment disparity trends across race and ethnicity mirror what we’ve seen in previous recessions and recoveries, but with <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/02/09/a-more-inclusive-economy-is-key-to-recovery" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">a commitment to more inclusive policies</a>, we can make this a moment where economic justice and equity is more fully realized than in the past.</p> <p><strong>-123,000</strong></p> <p>Government sector employment is down 123,000 jobs since August, which includes losses in local education support personnel such as crossing guards and cafeteria workers. These are <a href="https://www.dol.gov/general/HonoringEssentialWorkers" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">the essential workers</a> who are still, even now, helping us maintain our way of life and our children’s future through tremendous adversity. Local schools are on the front line in fighting COVID resurgence and these job losses will be a focus as we move forward.</p> <p>Recovery continues, but the recent COVID resurgence illustrates the challenges that still remain. Behind these numbers are difficult day-to-day choices that workers and their families are making about their health, their jobs and their household budgets. Everything we do should be aimed at easing those burdens and giving them the tools to emerge from this pandemic stronger than before.</p> <p><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.</em></p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-10-08T11:35:46-04:00" title="Friday, October 8, 2021 - 11:35" class="datetime">Fri, 10/08/2021 - 11:35</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/sept21-194k-480x360.png" width="480" height="360" alt="September 2021: 4.8% unemployment rate. +194,000 jobs." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-numbers" hreflang="en">jobs numbers</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-report" hreflang="en">Jobs Report</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/numbers-day" hreflang="en">Numbers Day</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 08 Oct 2021 15:35:46 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 3934 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2021/10/08/5-numbers-from-the-september-jobs-report#comments 5 Numbers from the August Jobs Report http://blog.dol.gov/2021/09/03/5-numbers-from-the-august-jobs-report <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Numbers from the August Jobs Report</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/09/03/5-numbers-from-the-august-jobs-report" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="5 Numbers from the August Jobs Report" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="August 2021. On average we've added 750,000 jobs per month for the last three months." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="While there’s still plenty of work to do, August’s report included some positive indicators." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/aug21-750k-avg-800x400png.pngg" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/aug21-750k-avg-800x400png.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="August 2021. On average we've added 750,000 jobs per month for the last three months." /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><img alt="August 2021. On average we've added 750,000 jobs per month for the last three months." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a7124250-6e92-4073-bde9-d9d7f803cc28" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/aug21-750k-avg-800x400png.png" class="align-center" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><p><a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest jobs report</a> had more good news for America’s workers and paints a picture of a recovering economy with strong job growth, even against the uncertainty of resurgent COVID transmission. Employment rose by 235,000 and the unemployment rate dropped from 5.4% to 5.2%. We’re still making our way towards pre-pandemic employment strength, and while there’s still plenty of work to do, August’s report included some positive indicators.</p> <p>Here are five numbers from the August jobs report to pay attention to.</p> <p><strong>+750,000</strong></p> <p>Over the past three months, we’ve added an average of 750,000 jobs per month. Lower growth in August may reflect ongoing concerns about the coronavirus. As I noted last month, lowering COVID-19 transmission rates is essential to restoring worker and consumer confidence. So if you need a vaccine or a booster (or know someone who does) check out <a href="https://www.vaccine.gov">vaccines.gov</a> to find a vaccination site near you.</p> <p><strong>5x</strong></p> <p>Our current rate of recovery is five times faster than what we saw during the Great Recession – great news for wages and working conditions. Average wages in restaurants and supermarkets are above $15/hour, and leisure and hospitality workers were earning an average of $18.82/hour, compared to $17.06 a year ago. In short, we’re seeing an economic recovery that’s empowering workers.</p> <p><strong>76%</strong></p> <p>The latest report showed that job growth in June and July were even higher than initially reported. To date, we’ve recovered 76% of the jobs we lost in March and April 2020. Since President Biden took office we have recovered 4.5 million jobs, a historic level of job growth.</p> <p><strong>+0.6%</strong></p> <p>Last month I said the Black unemployment rate was too high at 8.2%. In August, it rose to 8.8%, nearly twice as high as the white unemployment rate at 4.5%. A full economic recovery is one that benefits all workers, so it’s important to pay attention when specific communities aren’t experiencing the benefits. As I’ve said many times before, <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/02/09/a-more-inclusive-economy-is-key-to-recovery">more inclusive policies are key to economic recovery</a>.</p> <p><strong>8.8%</strong></p> <p>U-6 is a fancy economic term for the total number of unemployed people, plus everyone marginally attached to the labor force, plus everyone employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all people marginally attached to the labor force. That’s a mouthful, but it’s essentially our broadest measure of economic hardship, showing us how many people are working less than they want to. In August, that number dropped to 8.8% (down from 14.3% a year ago). That’s a positive sign of economic confidence and opportunity.</p> <p> </p> <p>Growth in specific industries was a bit of a mixed bag this month. Manufacturing went up. Leisure and hospitality was essentially unchanged. Retail dropped. Transportation and warehousing went up. Health care and nursing went down – particularly troubling because the pandemic is ongoing, the population is aging, and women of color are overrepresented in care economy jobs.</p> <p>So the big takeaway for August: Recovery continues, but there’s still work to do. As we look to <a href="https://www.dol.gov/LaborDay">Labor Day</a> and beyond, we want to put policies in place that will build on economic growth and empower all workers.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.</em></p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-09-03T10:40:44-04:00" title="Friday, September 3, 2021 - 10:40" class="datetime">Fri, 09/03/2021 - 10:40</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/aug21-750k-avg-480x360.png" width="480" height="360" alt="August 2021. On average we&#039;ve added 750,000 jobs per month for the last three months. " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/data" hreflang="en">data</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/unemployment-rate" hreflang="en">unemployment rate</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 03 Sep 2021 14:40:44 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 3914 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2021/09/03/5-numbers-from-the-august-jobs-report#comments 5 Numbers from July’s Jobs Report http://blog.dol.gov/2021/08/06/5-numbers-from-julys-jobs-report <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Numbers from July’s Jobs Report</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><img alt="July Jobs Report. +943,000 jobs added. 5.4% unemployment rate." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a672d142-ab4e-4904-97da-0b53bbedb2ea" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/july21-943k-800x400.png" class="align-center" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><p> </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{8}" paraid="1690688600">There was a lot to like in <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest jobs report</a>: Employment rose by 943,000, the unemployment rate dropped to 5.4% and hundreds of thousands of people rejoined the workforce in industries all across the economy. These are all major improvements from the heights of the spring 2020 recession. While we see continuing progress in the labor market, we still have a ways to go before we return to pre-pandemic employment strength.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{41}" paraid="867632519">Here are five numbers to help put the latest report in context. </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{49}" paraid="931224400"><strong>+832,000 </strong></p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{57}" paraid="1130568951">Over the past three months, the economy has added an average of 832,000 jobs per month – the fastest job growth since August 2020. That’s a sign that economic confidence is returning, even as concerns about the pandemic linger.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{63}" paraid="2075258438"><strong>0.5 </strong></p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{71}" paraid="2095357120">The unemployment rate dropped 0.5 percentage points in July, and for all the right reasons. Sometimes we see a dip because people give up on looking for jobs, but the labor force participation rate and employment-to-population ratio are both up. That tells us that people are looking for work and finding jobs. </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{77}" paraid="548385054"><strong>75% </strong></p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{85}" paraid="1872646766">We’ve reached an important milestone in our steady recovery of the jobs we lost in March and April 2020: We’ve recovered 75% of those jobs. Our next task is obvious: We must continue to work to restore the remaining 25%. </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{91}" paraid="873420806"><strong>8.2% </strong></p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{99}" paraid="1890118864">As I’ve said many times before, economic recovery isn’t equal across demographics – and positive news for the nation doesn’t automatically translate into positive news for individual communities. The Black unemployment rate is still too high at 8.2% and the Hispanic unemployment rate is also higher than full employment levels at 6.6%. These trends mirror what we’ve seen in previous recessions and recoveries, but I firmly believe that <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/02/09/a-more-inclusive-economy-is-key-to-recovery" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">more inclusive policies are key to economic recovery</a>.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{110}" paraid="548489836"><strong>2.5 million </strong></p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{118}" paraid="392862188">Despite the fact that the number of unemployed people fell by 782,000 to 8.7 million in July, long-term unemployment is still far too high. More than 3 million people have been out of work for at least 27 weeks, with 2.5 million of those out of work for 52 weeks or more. Black workers are overrepresented in this population.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{132}" paraid="594861514"><strong>The path forward </strong></p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{140}" paraid="1526453687">What does the path forward look like? Here are a few factors to keep your eyes on: equity, public policy and public health. </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{148}" paraid="1914053320">The Biden-Harris administration’s commitment to racial equity and inclusion will be key to ensuring an equitable recovery. At the Department of Labor, we’re throwing our weight behind that work to <a href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/05/03/the-departments-role-in-advancing-racial-equity-and-supporting-underserved-communities" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">make sure that the economic recovery reaches all Americans</a>.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{177}" paraid="828077451">The public sector has played a critical role in getting America back to work, and July’s report showed 240,000 new jobs added in government – but we’ll need more public sector growth to continue to fuel our recovery.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{183}" paraid="542208892">Lowering COVID-19 transmission rates will be key to restoring worker and consumer confidence. If you haven’t gotten a vaccine yet – or know somebody who needs to schedule an appointment – you can find a vaccination site near you at <a href="https://www.vaccine.gov/" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">vaccines.gov</a>.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{202}" paraid="398610997">There’s still plenty of work to do. If we continue adding jobs at the current pace, it would still be another nine months before we return to pre-pandemic levels, so we’re not ready for a victory lap just yet. Even so, July’s jobs report has a lot of promising indicators. We have made historic progress, thanks in large part to vaccinations, sound economic policy and the resilience of America’s workers. We’re still jogging uphill – but the view from here looks better all the time.  </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{219}" paraid="1272922206"> </p> <p paraeid="{be3b0f25-31d3-48a9-a696-6d3e601f70ed}{221}" paraid="1693400303"><em>Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor.  </em></p> <p> </p> <!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="“summary_large_image”/" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2021/08/06/5-numbers-from-julys-jobs-report" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="5 Numbers from July’s Jobs Report" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="July Jobs Report. +943,000 jobs added. 5.4% unemployment rate." /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Here are five numbers to help put the July jobs report in context." /><meta name="twitter:image" content=" https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/OPA/twitter-cards/20210806-blog-943k.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/OPA/twitter-cards/20210806-blog-943k.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="July Jobs Report. +943,000 jobs added. 5.4% unemployment rate." /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><p> </p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/lmcginnis" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov">McGinnis.Laura…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2021-08-06T09:37:17-04:00" title="Friday, August 6, 2021 - 09:37" class="datetime">Fri, 08/06/2021 - 09:37</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/july21-943k-480x360.png" width="480" height="360" alt="July Jobs Report. +943,000 jobs added. 5.4% unemployment rate." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4066" hreflang="en">Janelle Jones</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/numbers-day" hreflang="en">Numbers Day</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-report" hreflang="en">Jobs Report</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/jobs-numbers" hreflang="en">jobs numbers</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/checo" hreflang="en">CHECO</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/office-of-the-chief-economist" hreflang="en">Office of the Chief Economist</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 06 Aug 2021 13:37:17 +0000 McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov 3891 at http://blog.dol.gov http://blog.dol.gov/2021/08/06/5-numbers-from-julys-jobs-report#comments