Christine Machovec http://blog.dol.gov/ en New BLS Employment Projections: 3 Charts http://blog.dol.gov/2023/09/08/new-bls-employment-projections-3-charts <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New BLS Employment Projections: 3 Charts</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="MsoNormal">When you’re thinking about making a career change, what information do you look for? Most people want to know if that career is growing – is the demand for that type of work increasing or decreasing? Will there be more jobs of that type in the future or fewer?</p><p></p><p class="MsoNormal">That’s just one use among many for the employment projections data produced every year by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or BLS. The employment projections give students, job seekers, workers, employers, researchers, policymakers and others a good idea of how the labor force will change, which industries are likely to see growth, how fast specific occupations will grow and more.</p><p></p><p class="MsoNormal">The 2022-2032 employment projections data were released on Sept. 6, showing that the economy is projected to add almost 4.7 million jobs from 2022 to 2032. Here are some of the highlights: </p><h3 class="MsoNormal"><strong>1. Fastest growing occupational groups </strong></h3><p class="MsoNormal">Healthcare growth is being driven by an aging population and a higher prevalence of chronic conditions. Combined with the healthcare practitioners and technical occupational group, healthcare occupations are projected to account for approximately 2 out of every 5 new jobs added to the economy from 2022 to 2032. Demand for information technology products and services are fueling the increase in the computer and mathematical occupational group. Community and social service occupations – including counselors, social workers, and religious workers – are often adjacent to healthcare, so some of this group’s growth will be associated with the robust growth that is expected among healthcare occupations.</p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/bls-sept23-v2-top10.png" data-entity-uuid="ff89aeca-82ac-4895-8e78-d97f3d3db3af" data-entity-type="file" alt="Chart showing the top 10 occupational groups projected to grow the fastest from 2022 to 2032. They include healthcare support (15.4%); computer and mathematical (15.2%); healthcare practitioners and technical (8.0%); community and social service (7.8%); life, physical and social science (6.1%); personal care and service (6.1%), legal (5.9%), business and financial operations (5.6%); transportation and material moving (5.4%); and management (5.4%)." width="699" class="align-center" height="800" loading="lazy" /><p class="MsoNormal"></p><p></p><p class="MsoNormal"> </p><h3 class="MsoNormal"><strong>2. Growth of STEM occupations</strong></h3><p class="MsoNormal">Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) occupations include computer and mathematical, architecture and engineering, and life and physical science occupations, as well as managers and professors related to these fields of study. Strong demand for a variety of services provided by STEM occupations will drive the fast growth. For example, increasing demand for cybersecurity and software development services and products are expected to boost demand for computer occupations. And as the volume of data available and the potential uses for that data will likely increase, we expect more math-related workers will be needed to analyze these data and use them to make more informed decisions.</p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/bls-sept23-v2-stem.png" data-entity-uuid="f48c51dc-5a7e-4a4a-820c-d023fd25f7f7" data-entity-type="file" alt="Chart showing that STEM occupations are projected to grow much faster than average from 2022 to 2032 and pay significantly higher median annual wages." width="700" class="align-center" height="800" loading="lazy" /><p class="MsoNormal"> </p><h3 class="MsoNormal"><strong>3. Changes in labor force share by age group</strong></h3><p class="MsoNormal">Of all the age groups, people 65 and older are projected to experience the largest and fastest increase in the labor force. By 2032, all baby boomers will be between 68 and 86 years old. Workers in the 35-44 age group are projected to make up the largest share of the labor force in 2032, 23.0%, in part due to the millennial generation cohort (people born between 1981 and 1996) aging into that group by 2032. At the same time, the share of the youngest age groups – 16-to-24 and 25-to-34-year-olds – in the labor force are projected to decrease over the projections decade, the result of slower population growth in recent decades.</p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/bls-sept23-v2-age.png" data-entity-uuid="1a5e57e2-7850-4b7c-a86f-2f29d6b74c02" data-entity-type="file" alt="Chart showing the labor force share by age group for 2002, 2012, 2022 and 2032 (projected). The share of workers 65 and older is steadily increasing. The share of workers ages 16 to 24 is slowly decreasing." width="699" class="align-center" height="800" loading="lazy" /><p class="MsoNormal"> </p><p class="MsoNormal">Explore data on hundreds of occupations in the Bureau of Labor Statistics' <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/" target="_blank">Occupational Outlook Handbook</a>.</p><p class="MsoNormal"> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><em>Christine Machovec is an economist in the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. Follow BLS on Twitter/X at </em><a href="https://www.twitter.com/BLS_gov"><em>@BLS_gov</em></a><em>.</em></p><p class="MsoNormal"> </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/tkoebel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov">Koebel.Tiffany…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2023-09-08T16:46:55-04:00" title="Friday, September 8, 2023 - 16:46" class="datetime">Fri, 09/08/2023 - 16:46</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/Projections_800x550.png" width="800" height="550" alt="2022-2032 employment projections" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4277" hreflang="en">Christine Machovec</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/bureau-of-labor-statistics" hreflang="en">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bls" hreflang="en">BLS</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/statistics" hreflang="en">Statistics</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/labor-force" hreflang="en">labor force</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/occupational-outlook-handbook" hreflang="en">Occupational Outlook Handbook</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/job-growth" hreflang="en">Job Growth</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/stem" hreflang="en">STEM</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/stem-careers" hreflang="en">STEM careers</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bls-data" hreflang="en">BLS data</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 08 Sep 2023 20:46:55 +0000 Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov 4628 at http://blog.dol.gov Working Women: Data from the Past, Present and Future http://blog.dol.gov/2023/03/15/working-women-data-from-the-past-present-and-future <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Working Women: Data from the Past, Present and Future</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4>For Women’s History Month, we’re highlighting data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics on working women in the labor force from the past, present and future.</h4><h3>Past</h3><ul><li>The entrance of women into the workforce has influenced the labor force participation rate over the last several decades.</li><li>Historically, women’s labor force participation rate has increased overall since 1948, peaking in 1999 around 60%.</li><li>Since the new millennium, the total labor force participation rate and the women’s labor force participation rate have both fallen.</li></ul><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Chart showing the civilian force participation rate for women and both sexes over age 16, from 1948 to 2021, and projected for 2021 to 2031. " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dfbcb921-8058-4da5-b862-121875c5dd28" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/WHM1.png" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><figcaption><strong>Note: Shaded areas indicate recession. </strong>The labor force participation of women increased from 1948 until about 2000, with small dips during recessions in the early 1950s and around 1990. Since 2000, the rate for both sexes has declined slightly. Projections for 2021 to 2031 show women's participation staying about the same and a slight decline for both sexes.</figcaption></figure><h3>Present</h3><ul><li>Occupations with a large share of women are clustered in a few occupational groups, especially in healthcare practitioners and technical occupations.</li><li>Of the occupations highlighted below, half are part of the healthcare diagnosing or treating practitioners group or the health technologists and technicians group.</li><li>All of the occupations listed below require some level of postsecondary education for entry, and just under half typically require an associate degree or higher for entry.</li></ul><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Chart showing the top 15 occupations by share of women in 2021 and projected for 2031." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5d1b508f-d1b6-4c9e-b7a3-17d1e7ff21e6" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/WHM2.png" width="800" height="1000" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>The top 15 occupations by share of women are preschool and kindergarten teachers, speech language pathologists, dental hygienists, licensed practical and vocational nurses, school psychologists, veterinary technologists and technicians, dietitians and nutritionists, medical records specialists, nurse practitioners, child/family/school social workers, registered nurses, diagnostic medical sonographers, occupational therapists, paralegals and legal assistants, and interior designers. All are projected to grow through 2031. 2021 annual median wages vary, with the lowest for preschool and kindergarten teachers ($36,710) and the highest for nurse practitioners ($120,680). Educational requirements vary.</figcaption></figure><h3>Future</h3><ul><li>To the year 2031, a <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/tables/civilian-labor-force-summary.htm">projected increase in the number of total women in the labor force</a> will be driven by women over the age of 25 </li><li>Women in the prime age for working, ages 25 to 54, will join the labor force over the 10-year projection, adding roughly 2.9 million more workers.</li><li>The women’s labor force participation rate is <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/tables/civilian-labor-force-participation-rate.htm">projected to have a smaller decline than that for men</a>, despite both groups likely experiencing falling labor force participation in 2031.</li></ul><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Chart showing Projected Labor Force Changes for Women 2021-31. " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="299e9d35-5705-440b-8382-970e7dce93cb" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/WHM3.png" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>For all women, the projected labor force change from 2021-2031 is an increase of 4,652,000 or 6.1%. For ages 16 to 24, there is a projected decrease of 548,000 or 5.4%. For ages 25-54, there is a projected increase of 2,892,000 or 6.0%. For ages 55 and older, there is a projected increase of 2,309,000 or 13.2%.</figcaption></figure><p> </p><p><em>Christine Machovec is an economist in the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. Follow BLS on Twitter at </em><a href="https://www.twitter.com/BLS_gov"><em>@BLS_gov</em></a><em>.</em></p><p><em><strong>Editor's note</strong>: All data in the second chart except for the percent of each occupation that are women are from the </em><a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/"><em>BLS Employment Projections</em></a><em> program. The share of women workers by occupation in 2021 is from the </em><a href="http://www.bls.gov/cps/"><em>Current Population Survey</em></a><em> program, and the wage data is from the </em><a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/"><em>Occupational Employment and Wages Survey</em></a><em> program. </em></p><p> </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/tkoebel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov">Koebel.Tiffany…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2023-03-15T10:27:48-04:00" title="Wednesday, March 15, 2023 - 10:27" class="datetime">Wed, 03/15/2023 - 10:27</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/WHM-preview.png" width="500" height="360" alt="Chart showing Projected Labor Force Changes for Women 2021-31. " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4277" hreflang="en">Christine Machovec</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/bureau-of-labor-statistics" hreflang="en">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bls-data" hreflang="en">BLS data</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/womens-bureau" hreflang="en">Women&#039;s Bureau</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/womens-history-month" hreflang="en">Women&#039;s History Month</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/statistics" hreflang="en">Statistics</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/labor-force-participation" hreflang="en">Labor force participation</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/occupation-projections" hreflang="en">occupation projections</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 15 Mar 2023 14:27:48 +0000 Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov 4471 at http://blog.dol.gov Women and Girls in Growing STEM Jobs http://blog.dol.gov/2022/02/10/women-and-girls-in-growing-stem-jobs <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Women and Girls in Growing STEM Jobs</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><!-- START TWITTER CARD --><meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image" /><link href="https://blog.dol.gov/2022/02/10/women-and-girls-in-growing-stem-jobs" rel="canonical" /><meta name="twitter:title" content="Women and Girls in Growing STEM Jobs" /><meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="What is a STEM job?" /><meta name="twitter:description" content="Check out these five STEM occupations in which at least 1 in 6 jobs were held by women that are projected to grow faster than average." /><meta name="twitter:image" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/stem-women-blog-what-is-800x400.png" /><meta property="og:image:url" content="https://blog.dol.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/stem-women-blog-what-is-800x400.png" /><meta property="og:image:type" content="image/png" /><meta property="og:image:alt" content="What is a STEM job?" /><!-- END TWITTER CARD --><p>Friday, February 11 is International Day of Women and Girls in Science. This day is an opportune time to look at employment statistics for women working in <a href="https://www.bls.gov/oes/topics.htm#stem">science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM</a>.</p> <img alt="What’s a STEM job? Computer and mathematical, architecture and engineering, and life and physical science occupations; related managerial and postsecondary teaching occupations; sales occupations requiring scientific or technical knowledge at the postsecondary level." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="9b2e959b-752e-4347-ac5f-fc9ad6c593ba" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/stem-women-blog-what-is-800x400.png" class="align-center" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><p>Employment statistics from the <a href="https://www.bls.gov/cps/home.htm">Current Population Survey</a> show that women’s full-time employment has increased in many STEM occupations over the past decade, reaching a level of 2.3 million in 2021.</p> <p>As a group, STEM occupations are projected to grow 10.5% between 2020 and 2030, faster than the average for all occupations (7.7%). These STEM occupations pay more, and sometimes significantly more, than the median annual wage for all occupations of $41,950. Overall, STEM occupations had a median annual wage of $89,780 in May 2020.  </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Chart showing 2020 employment in STEM occupations and projected 2030 employment" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="482aaad0-f6cb-4e26-8607-db51f7bc4703" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/stem-women-blog-proj-800x400-2.png" width="800" height="400" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Wage data are from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wage data cover non-farm wage and salary workers and do not cover the self-employed, owners and partners in unincorporated firms, or household workers. <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/tables/stem-employment.htm">Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections</a></figcaption></figure><p>Here are five STEM occupations that are projected to grow faster than average from 2020–30, and in some cases much faster than average, in which at least 1 in 6 jobs were held by women:</p> <p> </p> <h4><a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/information-security-analysts.htm">Information security analysts</a></h4> <p>Information security analysts plan and carry out security measures to protect an organization’s computer networks and systems.</p> <p><strong>Women’s share of employment, 2021</strong>: 18%</p> <p><strong>2020 annual median pay</strong>: $103,590 per year</p> <p><strong>Typical entry-level education</strong>: Bachelor’s degree</p> <p><strong>Number of jobs, 2020</strong>: 141,200</p> <p><strong>Projected growth, 2020–2030</strong>: 33% (much faster than average)</p> <p><strong>Occupational openings, 2020–2030 annual average</strong>: 16,300</p> <p> </p> <h4><a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/software-developers.htm">Software developers and software quality assurance analysts and testers</a></h4> <p>Software developers design computer applications or programs. Software quality assurance analysts and testers identify problems with applications or programs and report defects.</p> <p><strong>Women’s share of employment, 2021</strong>: 20% (software developers) and 47% (software quality assurance analysts and testers)</p> <p><strong>2020 annual median pay</strong>: $110,140 per year</p> <p><strong>Typical entry-level education</strong>: Bachelor’s degree</p> <p><strong>Number of jobs, 2020</strong>: 1,847,900</p> <p><strong>Projected growth, 2020–2030</strong>: 22% (much faster than average)</p> <p><strong>Occupational openings, 2020–2030 annual average</strong>: 189,200</p> <p> </p> <h4><a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/operations-research-analysts.htm">Operations research analysts</a></h4> <p>Operations research analysts use advanced mathematical and analytical methods to help solve complex issues.</p> <p><strong>Women’s share of employment, 2021</strong>: 51%</p> <p><strong>2020 annual median pay</strong>: $86,200 per year</p> <p><strong>Typical entry-level education</strong>: Bachelor’s degree</p> <p><strong>Number of jobs, 2020</strong>: 104,100</p> <p><strong>Projected growth, 2020–2030</strong>: 25% (much faster than average)</p> <p><strong>Occupational openings, 2020–2030 annual average</strong>: 10,200</p> <p> </p> <h4><a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/industrial-engineers.htm">Industrial engineers, including health and safety</a></h4> <p>Industrial engineers devise efficient systems that integrate workers, machines, materials, information, and energy to make a product or provide a service.</p> <p><strong>Women’s share of employment, 2021</strong>: 26%</p> <p><strong>2020 annual median pay</strong>: $88,950 per year</p> <p><strong>Typical entry-level education</strong>: Bachelor’s degree</p> <p><strong>Number of jobs, 2020</strong>: 292,000</p> <p><strong>Projected growth, 2020–2030</strong>: 14% (faster than average)</p> <p><strong>Occupational openings, 2020–2030 annual average</strong>: 23,300</p> <p> </p> <h4><a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/medical-scientists.htm">Medical scientists</a></h4> <p>Medical scientists conduct research aimed at improving overall human health.</p> <p><strong>Women’s share of employment, 2021</strong>: 50%</p> <p><strong>2020 annual median pay</strong>: $91,510 per year</p> <p><strong>Typical entry-level education</strong>: Doctoral or professional degree</p> <p><strong>Number of jobs, 2020</strong>: 133,900</p> <p><strong>Projected growth, 2020–2030</strong>: 17% (much faster than average)</p> <p><strong>Occupational openings, 2020–2030 annual average</strong>: 12,600</p> <p> </p> <p><a href="https://www.bls.gov/cps/home.htm">Find more data on the U.S. workforce.</a></p> <p>See how the department is <a href="https://www.dol.gov/agencies/wb/grants/wanto">investing in opportunities to connect women to STEM and other nontraditional occupations</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Christine Machovec is an economist in the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. Follow BLS on Twitter at <a href="https://www.twitter.com/BLS_gov">@BLS_gov</a>.</em></p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/tkoebel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov">Koebel.Tiffany…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden"><time datetime="2022-02-10T12:01:21-05:00" title="Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 12:01" class="datetime">Thu, 02/10/2022 - 12:01</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-featured-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/WomenSTEM_480.png" width="481" height="360" alt="A woman sits at a desk in a lab coat working on a piece of computer equipment using a magnifying glass" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <a href="/taxonomy/term/4277" hreflang="en">Christine Machovec</a> <div class="blog-tags"> <span>Tags:</span> <ul> <li><a href="/tag/stem-careers" hreflang="en">STEM careers</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/women-in-stem" hreflang="en">women in STEM</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/in-demand-jobs" hreflang="en">in-demand jobs</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/growing-jobs" hreflang="en">growing jobs</a></li> <li><a href="/tag/bureau-of-labor-statistics" hreflang="en">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a></li> </ul> </div> Thu, 10 Feb 2022 17:01:21 +0000 Koebel.Tiffany.L@dol.gov 4068 at http://blog.dol.gov