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Insult to Injury: Is income inequality tied to worker safety?

Filed in Safety by on March 4, 2015 0 Comments
Insult to Injury: Is income inequality tied to worker safety?

Guadalupe González doesn’t know if she’s going to be able to make it much longer. The East Boston resident used to hold a full time position as a cleaner for Sodexo. Much of her time working was spent on the campus of Lasell College, located in the wealthy Boston suburb of Newton, where she was […]

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Limo Drivers Taken for a Ride of Their Own

Filed in DOL, Wage Enforcement by on March 3, 2015 0 Comments
Limo Drivers Taken for a Ride of Their Own

Like neon lights, slot machines and high-stakes gamblers, chauffeured luxury transportation is a vital feature of the fabled Las Vegas experience. But for nearly 500 drivers of one Vegas limousine company, Executive Las Vegas, improper pay practices left them with earnings below the minimum wage. One of those drivers was Navy veteran Anita Marten, who […]

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Defending the Rights of Workers in Honduras (Defendiendo los derechos de los trabajadores en Honduras)

Filed in International Labor, Workplace Rights by on March 2, 2015 0 Comments
Defending the Rights of Workers in Honduras (Defendiendo los derechos de los trabajadores en Honduras)

Lee este artículo en español. “It’s not about what we can do for the region; it’s about what we can do together.” Vice President Joe Biden spoke these words last November, at a conference to address the emigration crisis among the poorest three countries in Central America. I was reminded of these words in Honduras, […]

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10 Good Jobs that Don’t Need a Degree

Filed in Apprenticeship, Jobs by on February 28, 2015 0 Comments
10 Good Jobs that Don’t Need a Degree

Having a college degree is more important than ever when it comes to being competitive in today’s job market. But there are still some occupations that don’t require a degree − and which pay good wages. Typically, some kind of technical or professional training is required, such as an apprenticeship, on-the-job training or a licensing […]

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What You Need to Know About Women and Work During Black History Month

Filed in DOL, Women by on February 27, 2015 0 Comments
What You Need to Know About Women and Work During Black History Month

As Black History Month comes to a close and Women’s History Month begins, those of us at the Labor Department are reflecting on the important contributions that black women have made to our nation’s workforce. The past 50 years have displayed vast improvements, but there’s still more work to do. Take a look at this […]

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Celebrating Our Heritage and New Opportunities

Filed in Secretary Perez by on February 27, 2015 1 Comment
Celebrating Our Heritage and New Opportunities

Today is the 171st anniversary of the independence of the Dominican Republic, the country where my family came from. My mother arrived in the 1930s when her father was appointed ambassador to the U.S. After my grandfather spoke out against the brutal dictator in power, he was declared “non grata.” My father fled the regime […]

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Raising the Minimum Wage is a No Brainer

Filed in Minimum Wage by on February 27, 2015 1 Comment
Raising the Minimum Wage is a No Brainer

This week, the parent company of retail stores T.J. Maxx, Marshalls and HomeGoods said it will raise starting pay for its workers to $9 per hour. It joins a number of other large companies like Walmart, The Gap, IKEA and Aetna, as well as many small businesses across the country that have taken the same […]

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Fulfilling a Promise to Help Tribal Communities

Filed in Workforce Investment by on February 26, 2015 0 Comments
Fulfilling a Promise to Help Tribal Communities

At the White House Tribal Nations Conference in December, I gave attendees my word that the Department of Labor would clarify our grant guidelines to make sure that federally recognized tribes can apply for our various employment and training grant programs. Since then, the department has held consultation sessions with more than 150 tribal leaders […]

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Measuring Real Impacts for Workers

Measuring Real Impacts for Workers

We tend to measure progress with numbers. During fiscal year 2014, Wage and Hour Division investigations found more than $240 million owed to more than 270,000 workers whose employers violated the law and didn’t pay them the wages they had rightfully earned. Since fiscal year 2009, we’ve recovered more than $1.3 billion in back wages […]

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Our Lost Poet

Filed in Books that Shaped Work in America, DOL by on February 25, 2015 1 Comment
Our Lost Poet

Worlds collided when the nation’s Poet Laureate came to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It was a moment of discordance: a room filled with the scientists and engineers of OSHA – people who work in absolutes, in things measurable and provable – speaking with a man whose work was by its nature ineffable, exploring […]

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